Machine Knit Update

Hi there, long time no post! Making has been a bit hit-and-miss around here, but looking back through my photos, I realised that I still managed to make alot in the last year. Here’s a quick roundup of some of my knitting:

Made with Knitmaster 360, punchard 3, mixed sock yarns and patience!

I based my scarf on a picture of a shawl that was being sold as a kit at This is Knit – a Dublin yarn shop.

Triangular scarf made with Knitmaster 360

I also wanted to try smaller projects to practice the different techniques, and successfully adapted a hand-knit pattern to make this baby romper:

Baby Romper, 4ply on Knitmaster 360
The legs were made separately and rehung on the machine to knit the front and back separately as below
Back legs rehung on machine bed.
Popper snaps used for closures.

In hindsight I think regular buttons and buttonholes would work better – The knit could get pulled out of shape from pulling on the snaps.

My machine knitting has been improving slowly and I got ahead of myself and started imagining all the things I could make if I had a machine that took hand knitting yarn. Luckily, for under 50 euro – I found a secondhand machine that can take heavier wool (dk and chunky). It’s called a Zippy90, and has 90 needles….hence the name!

Twin Cardis, not quite perfect, but still cute!

I used acrylic dk and the tightest tension to make these baby cardigans, again from a hand-knit pattern.

I am also using it to finish off a chunky cardigan for my daughter. I knit the body by hand and the sleeves by machine.

I used the pattern below from Petite Knit.

Almost finished… it was originally meant to be for Xmas…oops!
Chunky cardigan being made with Hayfield Bonanza yarn.

And sometime last year, I made a neckwarmer as a gift for a friend.

Acrylic 4ply
Lined with cosy fleece.

I used the same punchcard design to make myself a cardigan, which might get it’s own post another day :

My kids won’t lose me in a crowd when I’m wearing this! (Even though it might make them want to 🤣).

Sin a bhfuil for now x

Machine knitting update

Picture heavy post to follow! ….. I’ve been on a steep learning curve with my knitting machine, and it’s all starting to click. I can cast on and do various things like ribbing or fairisle swatches without having to take out the manual every time!

First machine knit jumper!

The machine knit community had a month where we converted a hand knit pattern to machine and I used a pattern from Amy Milller, it has a fitted sleeve and a slight flare to the shape.

My handknit version from a few years ago is below, I didn’t go with the longer hem this time.

Hand knit Sweet Jane by Amy Miller.

I was able to match the stitch gauge of the pattern but had to make some calculations for the row gauge. Which wasn’t too difficult. First I counted the rows between increases, worked out how many cm it should measure and then figured out how many machine rows would give me the same cm measurement.

I made the back and used it to check my calculations. Then I made some mockup designs on my phone for the front intarsia:

I didn’t draw a chart for the design as it was simple angled lines. I took note of the rows where I would begin and end, and then hoped for the best.

Intarsia on my knit master uses a special carriage, the yarn is laid across the open needles by hand and the carriage passed across as you hold the yarn underneath to give it tension.

I then joined the pieces at the shoulders:

The yellow yarn is waste knitting which gets unravelled once the panels are joined.

Without changing the construction of the handknit pattern, I was able to short row the sleevecap straight into the armhole.

With a machine, all the stitches are placed onto the needles, then the outer needles are held in a non-working position until they are needed.

Short row sleeve cap, the needles on right are in non-working position.

All the needles at work for the rest of the sleeve.

After that I was able to rehang the sides and knit one loosely tensioned row to seam them. Followed by casting off.

I wasn’t confident in hems or ribbing yet so the roll neckline was finished with some loosely knitted rows of stockinette.

I was very pleased to finally get this far..!

The Finished jumper!

Machine Knitting a hat

I have decided that this is the year that I properly learn how to use my knitting machine. I own a (2nd hand) Knitmaster 360 and ribber. I have never given myself enough time to fully understand how these work.

The reverse of my hat, halfway through knitting

I have made a few things with them…you might find some old posts on this blog. (I still regularly wear that Cardigan!)

In order to motivate myself, I joined The Machine Knitting Community at the end of January. It’s run by a designer named Nic Corrigan who owns Whitehall Studio. The membership opens up 4 times a year, so that new people join in batches.

The Community operates through an app and website, where there are monthly Knitalongs, monthly zoom knit night, guest speakers and demonstrations. With all previous events recorded and available to watch at any time.

I’m slowly making my way through the videos, and have also followed the pattern and instructions for a previous Hat Kal.

My first machine knit hat! Pom Pom to be added!

I have never gotten to grips with my ribber, and within minutes of posting a query on how to get it set up, some helpful members directed me to some videos, and helped troubleshoot my setup. This alone was worth the joining fee!

My first hat was knitted and I made lots of great mistakes (I know that sounds odd… But hear me out)…

1. My ribbing was like cardboard… Due to setting it up wrong. I know better now!

2.The hat was too long… I will now remember to knit a swatch🤣.. (looking at my post from 7 years ago, I should have known that!)

3. If I don’t unlock the punchcard, the pattern will freeze and become vertical stripes (could be useful in future!.

Non stretchy ribbing and accidental stripes!

4.The patterning has some missed areas… Due to not pushing the carriage fully past the punchcard selectors.

It’s a steep learning curve and needs alot of patience/perseverance, but I’m enjoying the challenge.

I could have unravelled my practice hat and started again, but I needed to try to make it wearable, (why?…. Because sometimes I make life hard for myself!)

So I threaded a lifeline and cut off the grey ribbing.

I folded up a band and hung all the stitches back on the knitting machine…. (Probably won’t do that again… Too much time).Knitted a row and then cast off.

Once the side was seamed it was good to go!

Patterning mistakes are a bit more obvious on this side

I worked on some swatches during the week and plan to spend some more time at the machine this week, putting what I’ve learned into practice on a second hat.

And I’m also wearing a hand-knit in progress in the above picture… I’m working on the sleeves and will hopefully have a finished piece to show soon!

Caramel Cardigan

Sunset Posing

I started this Cardigan in April I think… And I finally finished it last weekend when I was nursing a sore back… (Nothing serious just too much running around on my week off work!).

The design was heavily inspired by one I had seen in a shop:

I didn’t have a pattern so I used a similar shaped coatigan to check my finished measurements:

This first sleeve attempt had to be ripped back…

I knitted the sleeves two at a time, to keep the shaping even. Checking them against the grey coatigan.

I only took rough notes as I was working on it in fits and spurts, so I might not be able to recreate it!

Shoulders are a bit wide here (also see 4 stitches at the seams)

It’s made from the bottom up with a seamless body and raglan sleeves, with 4 purl stitches at the seam.

I used short rows to build up the back neck and also to bring the shoulders in towards the neckline. The short rows blended well with the moss stitch.

Shawl collar and raglan seam reduced to 2 stitches

There were 4 stitches at the raglan seams, but after trying it on, I used mattress stitch to close 2 of them up so, that the seam was sturdier and narrower. (The raglan seams could be a bit neater as I think I mixed up a few k2tog with k1sl1psso!).

Reducing raglan seam using mattress stitch

I also added a row of crochet chain across the inside back neck for some extra strength. The front bands were knitted by picking-up stitches along the edges and around the back neck. Short rows and increases shaped the shawl collar.

Love the sleeve length… I like my thumbs to be almost covered!

This next one is for Stephanie! I found a moth wearing colours to match!

Wondering if I should add buttons..

I might add buttons and maybe pockets, but I’ll wear it a while first and see how it feels.

I’ll sign off with a lovely calm picture of a nearby beach cove… I love the evening colours over the sea.

Sunday Cardigans – PetiteKnit pattern

This post contains 2 cardigans for the price of one (It’s a Black Friday special!)

I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve finished making something and told myself that I need to make another version. It rarely happens though, instead I get distracted by the next new shiny pattern and forget all about it. Except this time…

Sunday Cardigan – I’m showing off the cuffs here – not just the lovely nail colour!

The picture above is actually the second version I made of the Sunday Cardigan by PetiteKnit. I made my coral one below first, I used a bulky wool and made it close fitting rather than having any extra ease in it.

I love the shaping lines and the doubled-over neckband

I love the shaping on the yoke and pictured a looser, snuggly version, in a longer length. I had a large ball of black acrylic in DK weight and mixed it with a light brown sock yarn to give it a marled effect. I went up a size from the 1st one (maybe 2 sizes actually – I can’t be certain now without counting the stitches!) .

Both cardigans needed a bit of added structure along the front bands. So on the coral one I added a strip of lace binding at the back:

lace binding

And on the longer cardigan, I decided against any closures and handstitched black tape to stabilise the edges which were stretching out.

You can see the before and after below:

Left edge without tape – right after tape was added

I have gotten so much wear out of these, that I might even make another one…… just as soon as the other 40 things on my knitting wish list are done 😉

Marled Sunday Cardigan