Denim Burda remake : 104 10/2016

I’m taking a break from making Roman blinds for my sister to write this…I generally only do these things for family ! They’re not difficult to make – more boring really, so I’m listening to podcasts (mostly Blindboy – I’d recommend btw – they’re pretty absorbing,  but only if you’re not offended by swearing!), and taking lots ..ie too many breaks 🙂

I’d always planned to make another version of this Burda dress, but I didn’t think it’d take 2 years!

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I actually made this back in August, but there was something that annoyed me about where the waist hit.  So,the other day, I separated the skirt from the bodice and added a 1″ strip at the waist. I then topstitched it to match the neckline.

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And it feels so much better. I don’t remember lengthening the bodice in the original, but there was something about the weight of this fabric that just felt better to have the skirt hit my waist a bit lower. ( sorry blurry pic below!)

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Because of my fabric width, I had to reduce the pocket flare a little, by folding out a crease on the pattern piece.  Which worked fine, since I didn’t like how far the pockets stuck out on the original pattern.

(Blurry and serious/cranky pose below!)

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I left off the sleeves due to fabric shortages, but it’s probably more versatile now.  I’m wearing it with a mustard polo neck, and it also looks grand with a shirt underneath. Since I’m always shivering – I wore it yesterday layered with my handknit cardigan (pattern by Andi Satterlund), and scarf that I bought for peanuts in a charity shop! 

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So, sin an scéal! Back to the blinds..

 

Burda 10/2016 104 (fancy pocket dress!)

This is a rarity for me – actually using a Burda Style Magazine in the same month as it was purchased.  I attempted the Burda Challenge in 2015, where you make something from each months issue, but I abandoned it early in the year.  It didn’t suit the way I make things.  I don’t shop for fabric regularly – I tend to pick fabric up as I see it, and then let it gather dust until the perfect pattern shows up.

The pattern is described on the Burdastyle site as the “Fancy Pocket Dress” !

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I’ve had the fabric more than two years – I got it from an Op shop in Australia. That makes me sounds like a globetrotter (I wish!)- I’d happily pack my bags and get on a plane to anywhere, but circumstances don’t usually allow for travel!  So that was my first time abroad in years, and I loved it! I saw lots of Melbourne and a little of Sydney. Anyway, on one of the days I took a bus tour to the Grampians and during a rest break, while everyone was getting tea – I popped into an Op shop and picked up a few bits, this fabric being one of them.

It’s a light stretch cotton, and I had 1.5 metres – which is less than the pattern calls for, but I had enough. I should say that the dress pattern is longer than it looks in the magazine- I cut 3 inches off the hem before sewing it.

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Despite the complicated shape of the pockets, this dress came together pretty quickly. I made it on a Friday evening and wore it to dinner on the Saturday evening! It isn’t lined – just overlocked and I made narrow facings for the necklines.

Because of the stretch in the fabric, I used iron-on interfacing strips at the neckline, shoulders and centre back at the zipper.

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The instructions for the pockets were as clear as usual with Burda…! So I took a few pictures as I went along which might help if anyone plans to make this.

This is how the skirt looked from the wrong side – I interfaced at the base of the pockets before snipping into the fabric. ( the centre pleats are tacked in place)

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You then need to pivot the pockets upwards at the point where it was snipped:

 

The pocket folds back on itself – you then stitch the pocket seam ,from the point at the base to the top edge- seen below at the left of the pocket piece.

(my pocket shape is a little uneven as I had to cut into the plain selvedge to get it to fit)

 

The baste the top edges to hold in place, before joining the skirt front to the bodice front.

The picture below is of the front right of the skirt – the triangle on the left is where the pocket was pivoted. You need to make sure to catch this fully when sewing the skirt side seams.

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Other than that, the dress was straight forward to make – once I had inserted the zip and joined the front and back at the shoulders, I tried it on and pinned the bodice sides to fit, continuing down to the skirt. Because of the triangle cutout at the pocket on the skirt, it would be difficult to let this out on the hips, unless you adjusted the width of the pleats.

When I tried it on, I didn’t like how much the pockets stuck out. My fabric wasn’t quite as drapey as suggested.  So I improvised by pushing the pocket in towards the centre front, and topstitching it down – it looks like an extra pleat on the skirt, and means the pocket is still roomy enough to use, but doesn’t stick out as much.

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That’s about it really – I’ll be keeping the pattern handy, as I would love this in a lighter fabric for the summer – and it looked great without the sleeves, so a sleeeveless version will have to go on the to-do list.